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Monthly Archives: April 2014

Rwanda – Justice: 20 years later, an uncompleted job

Twenty years after the genocide, justice has been done but not entirely. Some of the planners are still free. Arms traders, politicians or bankers who made it possible have not been prosecuted. And crimes committed by the victorious army have not been punished. Twenty years after the genocide of one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus,…

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Rwanda’s Ties with Neighbours Still Strained by Genocide

Rwanda is straining to mend relations with some of its neighbours, and previously close partner states, twenty years after the genocide against Tutsis and moderate Hutus. Relations with the Democratic Republic of Congo are still tense over the presence of remnants of the genocide forces, which regrouped under the Democratic Forces for Liberation of Rwanda,…

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Guinea Bissau – From the coup d’état to elections

Presidential elections will be held on 13 April. The difficult path from political turmoil to stability. On 12 April 2012, the people of Guinea-Bissau were surprised by another coup d’Ètat, when the country was a few weeks away from the second round of the presidential elections set for 29 April. Some elements of the armed…

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Economy – a new Rwanda is emerging

In 20 years, Rwanda has achieved remarkable progress on the economic and social fronts, partly because it made good use of substantial foreign assistance. Even some opposition leaders admit that 20 years after the genocide, Rwanda achieved undeniable progress on the economic and social fronts. When the Rwandan Patriotic Front took over Kigali on the…

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Mexico – The Planting Celebration

Mexico is a country that has venerated corn for many centuries. This is evident not only in the varied cuisine based on this grain, but also in the many enduring customs related to its worship. We look at the planting celebration. Corn is the divine grain, a key component of the human myth of origin…

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Catholic Church, never ceases to amaze

The presence of the mainline Churches, i.e. Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran and United, have been instrumental in setting up schools and health centres for many years. Today the government has taken control over the major health centres, building hospitals with the aid of International Funding Programmes in the major towns. But there are many mission schools…

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Fortnight Friday

There has always been a hidden economy in the remote, inaccessible areas which never feature in any account of Papua New Guinea. Only those who have lived in the interior of the country for any length of time will know how money crosses hands and how people can be extremely enterprising, without paying overheads or…

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Long-term economic vision

The mineral deposits of gold, oil and copper, and the production of palm oil has grown over the past few years, and become a major agricultural export. Luckily, landowners, especially on the coastal areas, have invested in this new industry, whereas, in the Highland provinces with restrictions on obtaining land for development due to customary…

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Papua New Guinea – The Land of the Unexpected

Much is known about the white beaches and pristine blue waters of the South Pacific, not to mention the idyllic atolls and lagoons with teaming coral reefs and exotic plant-life, but within those same waters, the second largest island in the world, Papua New Guinea, still remains an enigma and a land that has not…

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Comboni Missionaries ‘with the people’ in Africa’s most dangerous zones

The situation in South Sudan is still very unstable, with 900,000 displaced and more than one thousand people killed since the warring broke out several months ago. In the last few weeks, the Comboni Missionaries, based in the Leer mission, fled into the savannah to escape the violence and destruction. Here is their account. When…

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Central Africa – The days of the Apocalypse

The Central African Republic has been a hostage of violence for more than a year now. The Seleka rebels and Anti-Balaka (‘anti- machete’) militants, loot, ravage, kill. Places of worship are not spared. Here are some missionaries’ reports. “We heard explosions and gunfire. We panicked. Each of us tried to hide wherever he could. Gunfire…

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What the canonization of John XXIII and John Paul II means to Africa

African pilgrims, in great numbers, will be among the five million expected at St. Peter’s square and its environs for the canonization of two of the church’s great popes of our time. Popes John XXIII famously known as ‘the good pope’ and Pope John Paul II, known by many Africans as the ‘the white and…

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Advocacy

A Museum for advocacy?

A Museum can surely be an action of advocacy, if it provides awareness towards empowerment. The National Museum of African American History and Culture that ex…

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Baobab

Why the sea is salty.

Long ago, the sea was not salty. People got their salt from the mountain of salt across the sea. One day, the people in the village…

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Youth & Mission

Bennie was the wrong person, in the wrong place at…

Bennie had a thin, hollow face, the picture of malnutrition at 22 years of age, he had never been to school for more than a few…

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